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Website Design & Editorial Services

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Web Weavers began in 1998 as a website planning, design and maintenance service. Since then we have expanded our activities to include domain and website hosting and management as well as a wide range of editorial services. Now we have split Web Weavers into two separate services to meet the needs of two different groups of clients.

All of which means you're probably not highly familiar with the jargon of the Internet. What's an applet? Is a frame the same as a window? Do you care? If you do, the following short glossary of Internet terminology may help you to make sense of the geekspeak.
We've left out some of the more arcane terms. Let your I.T. manager (or your 11-year-old child) play with them.

A small application written in the Java language and included in the HTML code of a web page. Used to generate fancy text and image effects. An animated image of a small apple might be an applet.A computer program. Programmers show good application when the I.T. manager is preparing the annual merit ratings.

Your service provider, like your employees, should have a good, strong backbone. The transmitting capacity of an Internet or other network connection, measured in Bps (bits per second). Newer modems can theoretically transmit up to 56,000 bits per second, even if certain South African telephone lines can't. If you're late submitting your monthly sales report by modem, you can always blame "low bandwidth". It's not a good idea to blame the six tequilas you had last night.

Boud Rate: Another measure of a modem's transmission speed. Superceded recently by Bps (bits per second). If your expense claim is over the limit this month, you can always blame the "high board rate".

BROWSER: A program such as Netscape Navigator or Internet Explorer used to look up pages and websites on the Internet. Commonly used at lunchtime when the staff have time to relax. Also commonly used at other times when the boss isn't looking. Inspiration for the commonly used excuse: "Not tonight, dear, I have a modem."